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Kim T. Stephens on ESPN Discussing Criminal Defense, Due Process, and Jonathon Taylor

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Criminal defense attorney Kim T. Stephens was featured on an ESPN Outside the Lines special this weekend. During the interview, Stephens discusses the need for due process when student athletes, or regular students, are charged with a crime. In the video excerpt below Stephens is featured at the 3:25 and 4:25 marks in the video. Stephens and Brown will post the full interview once ESPN makes it available.

 

http://espn.go.com/espn/otl/story/_/id/13684416/georgia-bulldogs-sent-alabama-crimson-tide-officials-documents-related-assault-case-involving-jonathan-taylor

 

 

“Taylor’s attorney, Kim Stephens, said there is the potential for people to be treated unfairly under the new SEC rule if a case has not been adjudicated yet: “If a person commits domestic violence, if a person commits sexual misconduct, certainly they don’t need to be playing at any SEC school or any other school for that matter, they need to be punished in the courts and, if appropriate, incarcerated. But there needs to be due process, there needs to be fundamental fairness.”

 

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Student Judiciary Advice from Kim Stephens

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Academic Concerns:

While attending school in Athens, Georgia, it is important to adhere to your college’s policies on academic honesty, appropriate behavior, and campus safety. Defense attorney, Kim Stephens, often represents students involved in judiciary hearings at UGA, and based on his years of experience with the student judiciary process, he advises incoming freshman and returning students to be particularly aware of the following:

  1. Any knife having a blade over two inches—even a small fishing knife—is considered a weapon per state law and University of Georgia regulations and is not allowed on campus, including in the dorms. If you are found to be in possession of such a knife, you will likely be charged with a felony.
  2. Plagiarism (using someone else’s ideas or words without proper citations) is considered a serious offense at the college level and can result in suspension or expulsion.
  3. Sharing test information or prior tests is considered academic dishonesty and can result in suspension or expulsion.
  4. If you are charged with a crime while attending college, and the college is made aware of the charge, they will hold a conduct hearing. The student judiciary has the power to suspend or expel you from the university EVEN IF the charges are dismissed or disproved.

Kim Stephens is familiar with the inner workings of the University of Georgia’s student judiciary and provides students with professional advice, often enabling them to continue their studies at the university even after facing charges by the student judiciary. In 2013, Kim Stephens successfully filed a petition for a temporary protective order and injunction which prevented a University of Georgia student charged with a serious crime (which was later disproven and dismissed) from being expelled.  It is critical that students who find themselves facing a student conduct hearing seek professional advice to protect their future.

 

IF YOU HAVE BEEN CHARGED WITH A CRIME OR ARE FACING A STUDENT JUDICIARY HEARING, CALL KIM STEPHENS TODAY FOR PROFESSIONAL ADVICE AND A POWERFUL DEFENSE. 706.548.3933

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